Editor’s Note: This report includes a discussion of domestic violence. If you or someone you know needs help, call the Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-228-7395. When Karen Tronsgard-Scott first learned that 22-year-old Emily Ferlazzo had been reported missing in Bolton, Vt earlier this week, she had a hunch about the situation. link of violence there, ”she said. Tronsgard-Scott, of VT Network Against Domestic and Sexual Violence, was heartbroken to learn that police confirmed their suspicions earlier this week after Emily’s husband Joseph Ferlazzo, 41, pleaded not guilty first degree murder. indictment for allegedly shooting Emily twice in the head while on vacation to celebrate their wedding anniversary. Court documents indicate that Emily’s family have raised concerns about domestic violence in the relationship. It’s a reality that Tronsgard-Scott says is far too prevalent in Vermont households. “Probably every person in Vermont knows someone who has been a victim of domestic violence or who uses relationship violence,” she said. In fact, domestic violence calls are common in Vermont. state and other agencies. From 2017 to October 21, 2021, Vermont State Police reported responding to 1,370 domestic violence calls. On average, the agency said that about half of all Homicides that occur every year are linked to domestic violence. ”What this tells me is that domestic violence is incredibly prevalent here. domestic violence issues, ”said Tronsgard-Scott. It’s so common that some police departments, like the Burlington Police Department, have family violence prevention divisions. Christopher Sweeney has been involved in domestic violence cases with the Burlington Police Department since early 2020. “I investigate domestic violence. I make arrests. I support survivors and things like that, but my role , as the title suggests, is Prevention of Domestic Violence. Officer, “he said. Sweeney said he felt very responsible for building trusting relationships with the people he cared for. called in to help them and put them in touch with the resources they need. Experts note that sometimes victims of domestic violence are reluctant to call law enforcement because they fear their partner will be arrested. in turn, could take away housing, financial stability and other security. Sweeney said not all cases have to end in arrest, and he is happy to talk to victims about what they are going through and of help them in a way that best meets their needs. Often times this involves putting them in touch with resources, or doing things like getting them to safe and secure accommodation and making sure they have a working cell phone. “If we can put them in touch with these resources, even if it never goes through the police department at the end or goes through the court process, we have always done our job,” he said. Tronsgard-Scott agrees. She wants Vermonters to be aware of warning signs, such as poorly explained physical injuries or traits of jealousy or controlling the behavior of a person’s partner. “The first way to help (people experiencing domestic violence) is to believe what the person tells you. If someone says, “I’m worried about my relationship. be hurt, ”believe them,” she said. Tronsgard-Scott ultimately wants those involved in these situations to know that they are not alone, and that help is there. -800-489-7273 Teen Dating Abuse: 1-866-331-9474 Deaf or Hard of Hearing: https://dvas.org/LGBTQ Help: www.pridecentervt.org/programs/[email protected] Hotline: 802-863-0003 Toll Free: 866-869-7341 Click here for legal aid options related to domestic violence.

Editor’s Note: This report includes a discussion of domestic violence. If you or someone you know needs help, call the Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-228-7395.

When Karen Tronsgard-Scott first learned that 22-year-old Emily Ferlazzo had been reported missing in Bolton, Vermont earlier this week, she had a hunch about the situation.

“We, of course, (we were) worried that there was a link to domestic violence there,” she said.

Tronsgard-Scott, of VT Network Against Domestic and Sexual Violence, was heartbroken to learn that police confirmed their suspicions earlier this week after Emily’s husband Joseph Ferlazzo, 41, pleaded not guilty on a first degree murder charge for allegedly shooting Emily twice in the go on vacation to celebrate their wedding anniversary.

Court documents indicate that Emily’s family have raised concerns about domestic violence in the relationship.

It’s a reality that Tronsgard-Scott says is far too prevalent in Vermont households.

“Probably every person in Vermont knows someone who has been a victim of domestic violence or uses relationship violence,” she said.

In fact, domestic violence calls are common among Vermont State Police and other agencies.

From 2017 to October 21, 2021, Vermont State Police said they responded to 1,370 domestic violence calls. On average, the agency said that about half of all homicides that occur each year are related to domestic violence.

“What this tells me is that domestic violence is incredibly prevalent here. We enjoy a lifestyle in Vermont that is overall incredibly safe, with the exception of issues related to domestic violence.” , said Tronsgard-Scott.

It’s so common that some police departments, like the Burlington Police Department, have family violence prevention divisions.

Cpl. Christopher Sweeney has been involved in domestic violence cases with the Burlington Police Department since early 2020.

“I investigate domestic violence. I make arrests. I support survivors and things like that, but my role, as the title suggests, is that of a domestic violence prevention officer,” a- he declared.

Sweeney said he feels very responsible for building trusting relationships with the people he called to help them and putting them in touch with the resources they need.

Experts note that sometimes victims of domestic violence are reluctant to call law enforcement because they fear their partner will be arrested. This, in turn, could deprive of housing, financial stability and other means of security.

Sweeney said not all cases have to end in arrest, and he is happy to talk to victims about what they are going through and to help them in the way that best meets their needs.

Often times this involves connecting them to resources or doing things like getting them to safe and secure housing and making sure they have a working cell phone.

“If we can put them in touch with these resources, even if it ultimately never goes through the police service or the legal process, we have still done our job,” he said.

Tronsgard-Scott agrees.

She wants Vermonters to be aware of the warning signs, such as poorly explained physical injuries or traits of jealousy or controlling behavior in a person’s partner.

“The best way to help (people experiencing domestic violence) is to believe what the person tells you. If someone says, “I’m worried about my relationship. ” she said.

Tronsgard-Scott ultimately wants those involved in these situations to know that they are not alone and that that help is there.

Domestic Violence Hotline: 1-800-228-7395

Sexual Violence Hotline: 1-800-489-7273

Teen Dating Abuse: 1-866-331-9474

Deaf or hard of hearing: https://dvas.org/

LGBTQ Help: www.pridecentervt.org/programs/safespace

Click here for legal aid options related to domestic violence.


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