An army veteran who organizes annual cleanups of U.S. cities has expressed shock at the squalid conditions along the U.S.-Mexico border, as thousands of mostly Haitian migrants gathered in the town of Del Rio .

John Rourke, founder of the Great American Clean-Up, said he and his team were taken aback by the scenes.

Del Rio has seen an increase in migrant arrivals, with the city of 35,000 seeing around 14,000 mainly Haitian migrants reaching their district over the weekend.

Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas was in town on Monday, but Rourke told Fox News’ Tucker Carlson that more needs to be done.

“Let me tell you what I saw,” Rourke said.

John Rourke recounted the heartbreaking scenes he saw in Del Rio, Texas on Wednesday night

A makeshift migrant camp is seen in Del Rio, Texas on Wednesday

A makeshift migrant camp is seen in Del Rio, Texas on Wednesday

Migrants, many from Haiti, are seen in an encampment along the Del Rio International Bridge

Migrants, many from Haiti, are seen in an encampment along the Del Rio International Bridge

Migrants traveled back and forth between Texas and Mexico, across the Rio Grande

Migrants traveled back and forth between Texas and Mexico, across the Rio Grande

Young child clings to his father as he crosses the river to the United States

Young child clings to his father as he crosses the river to the United States

“I saw people washing babies in the Rio Grande.

“I’ve seen women breastfeed babies, sleep in dirt, 107 degrees outside, red ants everywhere, real coyotes – those with four legs that roam.

“It’s like Naked And Afraid: The Southern Border Edition over there.

“People are literally chopping down trees and setting up lean-tos and teepees and sleeping under them.”

He said he and his colleagues “had collected thousands of pounds of garbage along the southern border.”

The photos of the distressing scenes sparked widespread anger.

Women and young children are seen lying on the camp floor among plastic bottles, empty Oreo packets and food containers

Women and young children are seen lying on the camp floor among plastic bottles, empty Oreo packets and food containers

A young girl stands in what she currently calls her home in a makeshift camp under the Del Rio Bridge in Texas

A young girl stands in what she currently calls her home in a makeshift camp under the Del Rio Bridge in Texas

A Haitian passport is seen in a garbage pile near the international bridge between Mexico and the United States on Tuesday evening

A Haitian passport is seen in a garbage pile near the international bridge between Mexico and the United States on Tuesday evening

Desperate migrants, many of whom are families with young children, are forced to sleep on dirty floors or – if they’re lucky – on boxes folded flat.

Many of the 8,600 people who remain there have resorted to making makeshift tents using discarded clothing and tree branches to provide at least shelter from the elements.

The heat has been miserable over the past week with temperatures reaching 90 degrees. Families resorted to swimming in the dirty water of the Rio Grande River to cool off.

The misery is more reminiscent of a country in the developing world than the land of the American dream, where thousands of migrants have fled in the hope of seeking asylum and building a better life.

A migrant walks past a pile of garbage in the camp under the Del Rio Bridge in Texas on the US-Mexico border on Tuesday evening

A migrant walks past a pile of garbage in the camp under the Del Rio Bridge in Texas on the US-Mexico border on Tuesday evening

An aerial photo shows the huge piles of garbage that are just steps away from places where young children sleep

An aerial photo shows the huge piles of garbage that are just steps away from places where young children sleep

Empty water bottles, containers of food and other trash are strewn about as mountains of trash rise into the air.

An aerial photo shows the huge garbage piles from above, which are seen just steps away from places young children call home.

In another image, women and young children lie among plastic bottles and an empty Oreo package, on the ground covered with the remains of trees that were used to shape the shelters.

THE HATIAN MIGRANT CRISIS IN FIGURES:

Number of migrants in Del Rio at the height of the crisis: 14,600

Number of migrants on Tuesday evening: 8,600

Number of deportees to Haiti on Sunday: 327

Number of expelled Monday: 233

Number of expelled Tuesday: 523

Total evictions since the start of the flights on Sunday: 1,083

Number of expulsion flights planned for Wednesday: 7

Another photo shows a Haitian passport in a garbage heap including empty aluminum cans, an old shoe and discarded clothes.

Rourke said that upon his arrival he and his team rescued struggling migrants from the river.

“In 15 minutes we got three people out of the river,” he told Carlson.

“We have gone from collecting garbage to removing people from the Venezuelan river.”

He continued, “They come and go from Mexico just like me or you cross the street. There is no one to stop them. We spoke to a ton of them.

“About 85% of the people under this bridge were Haitians. The majority of them came from South Florida.

“A lot of them are going to Miami, Fort Lauderdale, West Palm Beach, Orlando.”

The cramped conditions have also fueled fears of a COVID-19 outbreak – especially since migrants crossing the border are not required to be vaccinated before entering the United States.

Rourke said he asked them about their vaccine status, and many said they didn’t want to take it.

“I asked them about COVID-19,” he said.

‘I was there. I asked them if they had been vaccinated or not, and if there was a vaccine available, would you take it.

“He categorically said no, they wouldn’t take him.

“Many of them cited religious beliefs as to why they would not have accepted it.”

And he said the migrants told him they were coming because Joe Biden made them feel more welcome than Donald Trump.

“They come here because where they’re from is so poor and they want the opportunity – they feel like it’s the opportunity, now that the Biden administration is here, to leave the country they are in.” have lived, Central America, places like Chile, and come here now.

“And they told me to my face that the reason they’re here is because Joe Biden allows us to come here.”

“He is a very humble man, he has a big heart, he loves the Haitian people, and we love him.

“It was almost like the biggest Biden rally I have ever been to. Everyone who was there was talking about Joe Biden. They like it.

Thousands of people are forced to sleep on the bare ground or on carpets placed among the debris of felled trees to provide shelter

Thousands of people are forced to sleep on the bare ground or on carpets placed among the debris of felled trees to provide shelter

Shocking images have emerged of the squalid and foul migrant camp under the Del Rio Bridge in Texas which is currently home to thousands of Haitian migrants

Shocking images have emerged of the squalid and foul migrant camp under the Del Rio Bridge in Texas which is currently home to thousands of Haitian migrants

Nearly 15,000 migrants, mostly Haitians, camped under the bridge over the weekend after crossing the United States from Mexico.

Many fled Haiti after the 2010 earthquake and live in countries in South America, including Brazil and Chile.

But since those countries were ravaged by the COVID-19 pandemic, many Haitians have traveled across South America and Mexico to seek asylum in the United States.

Biden was blamed after a proclamation in May that Haitians in the United States would not be deported for 18 months due to instability in their home country and could apply for documents to work in the United States.

This only applied to Haitians already in the United States at the time, but thousands of people have since made the journey to the border in an attempt to take advantage.

Most of them live in Chile and Brazil, having settled there after the devastating earthquake of 2010 which killed 200,000 people.

Border patrol agents struggling to deal with the large numbers fairly quickly set up the makeshift camp under the bridge as a temporary home.

Last week, there were concerns that there would not be enough food, water and basic supplies to meet the needs of the thousands of migrants living at the site.


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